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Date: 1652

"He did not antedate his own knowledge, nor remember the several postures of his soul, and the famous exploits of his minde before he was born; but plainly profest that his understanding came naked into the world. He shews you an [...], an abrasa tabula, a virgin-soul espousing it self to the bod...

— Culverwell, Nathanael (bap. 1619, d. 1651)

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Date: 1652

"Had you such notions as these when you first peept into being? at the first opening of the souls eye? in the first exordium of infancy? had you these connate Species in the cradle? and were they rockt asleep with you? or did you then meditate upon these principles?"

— Culverwell, Nathanael (bap. 1619, d. 1651)

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Date: 1656

"We answer, Sight is twofold, corporeal and spirituall; the first is that of Sense, the other the Intellectuall faculty, by which we agree with Angels; this Platonists call Sight, the corporeall being only an Image of this"

— Stanley, Thomas (1625-1678)

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Date: 1656

"So Aristotle, Intellect is that to the Soul which sight is to the Body: Hence is Minerva (Wisdom) by Homer call'd, Bright-ey'd"

— Stanley, Thomas (1625-1678)

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Date: 1657

Fancy is "The roving, pregnant, busie, teeming sence."

— Poole, Joshua (c.1615–c.1656)

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Date: 1660, 1676

"Will and Conscience are like the cognati sensus, the Touch and the Taste; or the Teeth and the Ears, affected and assisted by some common objects, whose effect is united in matter and some real events, and distinguished by their formalities, or metaphysical beings."

— Taylor, Jeremy (bap. 1613, 1667)

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Date: 1660, 1676

"In the actions of human entercourse, and the notions tending to it, reason is our eye, and to it are notices proportion'd, drawn from nature and experience, even from all the principles with which our rational faculties usually do converse."

— Taylor, Jeremy (bap. 1613, 1667)

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Date: 1665

"In the human heart new passions are for ever being born; the overthrow of one almost always means the rise of another."

— La Rochefoucauld, François, duc de (1613-1680)

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Date: 1665

"Condemned men sometimes affect a steadfastness and indifference to death which is really only fear of looking death in the face; thus it can be said that this steadfastness and indifference do for their spirit what the bandage does for their eyes."

— La Rochefoucauld, François, duc de (1613-1680)

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Date: 1665

"The sicknesses of the soul have their ups and downs like those of the body; what we take to be a cure is most often merely a respite or change of disease."

— La Rochefoucauld, François, duc de (1613-1680)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.