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Date: 1751

"[H]e took the road to the garison, in the most elevated transports of joy, unallayed with the least mixture of grief at the death of a parent whose paternal tenderness he had never known; so that his breast was absolutely a stranger to that boasted Storgh, or instinct of affection, by which the ...

— Smollett, Tobias (1721-1777)

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Date: 1751

"in consequence of which, he mustered up the ideas of his first passion, and set them in opposition to those of this new and dangerous attachment; by which means, he kept the balance in equilibrio, and his bosom tolerably quiet."

— Smollett, Tobias (1721-1777)

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Date: 1751

The imagination may be "incessantly haunted" by the "apprehensions of a jail"

— Smollett, Tobias (1721-1777)

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Date: 1751

Ideas of a love object with another lover may haunt the imagination

— Smollett, Tobias (1721-1777)

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Date: 1751

A beloved may acquire "the most absolute empire over" a lover's soul

— Smollett, Tobias (1721-1777)

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Date: 1751

"My breast, by wary maxims steel'd, / Not all those charms shall force to yield"

— Smollett, Tobias (1721-1777)

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Date: 1751

"In this corps he remained three years, during which, he had no opportunity of seeing actual service, except at the affair of Glensheel; and this life of insipid quiet, must have hung heavy upon a youth of M---'s active disposition, had not he found exercise for the mind, in'reading books of amus...

— Smollett, Tobias (1721-1777)

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Date: 1753

The heart may a "stranger to those young desires which haunt the fancy and warm breast of youth"

— Smollett, Tobias (1721-1777)

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Date: 1753

Indignation and Sorrow may be predominant passions

— Smollett, Tobias (1721-1777)

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Date: 1753

One may "blow the coals of jealousy"

— Smollett, Tobias (1721-1777)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.